WHICH DEGREES HAVE THE BEST CHANCE OF EMPLOYMENT AFTER?

You spend six years in high school, busting your gut to chase the elusive 99 ATAR. You work hard to get accepted into medicine, or law, or communications or pharmacy. 

You're elated to be accepted into university, you study hard with a blur of work, part time jobs and finally your parents allow you to develop a bit of a social life. You graduate and are ready to begin the rest of your life. 

BUT THERE'S A PROBLEM

You graduate into a field that has decreasing graduate opportunities and increasing graduates looking for jobs. You are forced to intern for two years or to make do with an unqualified position slightly outside of your field. 

Graduating isn't the end of the story


That experience is becoming more and more common. ABC covered it here. What it means is that we think about the position we will be graduating into throughout high school. It's not future you's problem. It's a problem for you to tackle - and beat - today!

"In 2008 only 22 per cent of graduates in language and literature had a full-time job, and that's dropped to 12 per cent."

Courses with the WORST chance of finding a job

According to GradState 2016 the courses with the worst chance of finding a job directly after graduating are the creative arts, psychology,  computing and information systems, science and mathematics, and agriculture and environmental studies. Each of these courses scored between 30-45% of graduates without a job. 

Some of these may be what you expect, but what about computer and information technology? Or Psychology? 

Courses with the BEST chance of finding a job

Dentistry, Pharmacy, Rehabilitation and Veterinary Science.

It is interesting that psychology gives you less security then vet science. 

Obviously, these statistics won't represent every persons experience and it's important to make up your own decision. You could easily be in the group who find a job straight out of university, but it is something to keep in mind as you move towards senior school. 

See the full statistics here